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Kringla
In the Kitchen

Kringla

For the next couple of months, my posts will focus mainly on recipes.  Isn’t eating what the holidays are about?  Sorry to any of you that aren’t into the recipes.  Don’t worry; I’ll sprinkle in a few non-food posts, so be patient.

I’m going to share my old favorites as well as a few new things I’m trying this year.  While the old standbys are good, it’s nice to find a new favorite every once in a while, isn’t it?

This first recipe is for kringla.  I am not Norwegian so there’s no family history with this.  Last year, I learned how much my sister loves kringla, and she was buying it!!  😮  I knew I could make it for her instead.  And because the last two years she’s had to wait a while for her birthday present from us, I’ve included a batch of kringla as interest.

The recipe I found is called Iowa Kringla.  Not sure what is special about Iowa kringla but it caught my eye.  Never having made it before, I was looking for anything that would steer me to a good recipe.  And I definitely lucked out.  This kringla is good!!  My sister loves it and so does her dog, who evidently is a kringla connoisseur.  However, after a health scare last summer, he’s now limited to a low-fat diet so he can no longer eat it.  😢

Don’t let it intimidate you.  It’s very simple to make.   Just make sure you allow enough time, since the dough has to chill.

And don’t make the mistake I made this last time.  Thinking I’d save a bowl, I put the baking soda directly in the buttermilk container and shook it to mix it up.  Soon afterwards, I noticed the buttermilk was oozing out of the top of the container!!  So, be smarter than I am and put your buttermilk in a bowl before you add the baking soda.  😁  (Science wasn’t my forte.)

Kringla

This recipe makes light and airy kringla that melts in your mouth. It can be eaten plain or with butter, as a snack or for breakfast. They're yummy any time of day!!
Course Breakfast, Snack
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 35 kringla

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 c. sugar
  • 1/2 c. butter
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 c. buttermilk
  • 3 1/2 c. flour
  • 1 t. baking powder
  • 1 t. baking soda (dissolve in the buttermilk)
  • 1/4 t. salt
  • 1 t. vanilla

Instructions

  1. Cream together the sugar and butter. Mix in the eggs and vanilla.
  2. In another bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients - flour, baking powder and salt.
  3. Add the dry ingredients alternately with the buttermilk (that contains the baking soda).
  4. Chill the dough. The longer the better. At least a couple of hours, but overnight is the best.
  5. Preheat the oven to 450º.
  6. Roll small pieces of dough into a pencil shape. (My dough is usually a little sticky, so I've found I need to use flour to roll out the dough.)
  7. Form each pencil shape into a figure 8 and place it on a parchment paper lined baking sheet. (Don't worry if they're not perfect figure 8s. Mine usually look more like an ampersand. 😉)
    Kringla
  8. Bake until light brown, about 5-7 minutes. Check them at 5. You can always bake them longer if they need more time.

Recipe Notes

These freeze very well.  Put them in a freezer bag and when you're ready for one (or two or ...), pop them in the microwave for 15-20 seconds.  They taste like they're fresh from the oven.

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4 Comments

  • AnNyce

    I am so impressed! Kringla are not easy! My mom would bake Kringla. I’m not kidding when I say there was always Kringla dough in the fridge! I’d watch her twirl the dough and literally DROP them onto the cookie in one continuous movement into a perfectly shaped 8. I wish I would have video of that! Many friends and relatives would stop for a cup of coffee and a Kringla since we lived right across from Fareway. The coffee was always on and Kringla were often served. My mom baked many different kinds of cookies, however, Kringla were the best! No, we are not Norwegian. My maternal grandma came to Jewell, Iowa from Denmark. 🤷‍♀️

    • retired introvert

      I never knew that about your mom. We were introduced to kringla through our next door neighbors, the Ballentines. Wow, that was a LONG time ago!! If you have your mom’s recipe, pass it on. I’d love to try it.

  • Angie

    Linda – Kringla is my go to Norwegian (I am Norwegian) treat for Christmas! Sometimes I will make it in the summer for family reunions. Not sure why I don’t make it any other time because there isn’t anything “Christmas-y” about it!!! We need to compare notes!!!

    • retired introvert

      I would love to compare notes. But it sounds like you’re the expert so I’ll probably benefit more than you will!!!

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